Archives for technology

Beyond Fixation: BOSS IT’s Obsessive Nurturing of Vintage Tech

Every so often, we stumble upon hidden treasures in the most unexpected places. Picture this: a computer humming away, emanating heat that warms the entire room, adorned with layers of cat and dog hair, a true relic of a bygone era. These aging machines, despite their antiquity, hold a special place in the hearts of their owners, who are steadfast in their determination to keep the nostalgic flame alive.

At BOSS IT, we’ve made it our mission to breathe new life into these time-worn tech wonders. These aging computers, with their clunky Mechnical PS2 keyboards and noisy hard drives, might seem like candidates for the local tip or even better a technology museum, but for their devoted owners, they are cherished artifacts worth preserving.

Virtual machines may be a modern alternative, offering a streamlined and efficient solution to computing needs. However, our clients yearn for more than just practicality. They crave the familiar hum of the old machines, the tactile feel of the keys, and the comforting warmth that only a vintage computer can provide. It’s not just about functionality; it’s about rekindling the emotions and experiences tied to a bygone era.

BOSS IT understands the sentimentality attached to these aging relics, being supporting and tinkering with them since 1990’s. We keep old PCs alive while offering the imaging their OS for a potential move to a new Machine inside a VM.

In a world where technology relentlessly pushes forward, BOSS IT stands as a beacon for those who wish to hold on to a piece of the past. Sometimes, the most precious gems are the ones covered in a layer of dust, waiting to be rediscovered and cherished once more.

Where Technology Breaks, Diets Bend, and Cookies Conquer

Meet Jamie Boss, your local IT whiz, and Melissa, the genius behind delectable baked goods that are as good for your taste buds as they are for your soul.

When her PC was on the verge of giving up, BOSS IT, your trusted IT service, stepped in to save the day. We fixed it, backed up her precious data, and, in return, were greeted with a bag of her signature rose water and macadamia cookies.

These cookies aren’t just your ordinary treats; they’re a divine blend of flavours and a testament to her culinary artistry. They’re the perfect fuel for entrepreneurs like us, sweetening the journey with every bite. At the heart of it all is our shared entrepreneurial spirit, clearly obvious is that we both love what we do.

However, I must confess, my stringent workout and diet routine went out the window as I sucked down a whole bag of these cookies in the car on the way back to the office. With much guilt and absolutely no control whatsoever. It’s official – they’re irresistible!

Support local businesses, Cherish unexpected friendships, and savor the delicious moments in life.

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Old School IT – The Floppy Disk Drill Hack

Picture this: You pull out a USB stick and, with a simple drill, you drill a hole in it, doubling its storage capacity. Well, not quite a USB stick, but back in the early days, we used a hack to do something similar with ordinary floppy disks.

In the late ’80s and early ’90s, floppy disks were the go-to method for storing digital data on personal computers. They came in various shapes and sizes, with the 3.5-inch floppy being the most popular choice, although the larger and thinner 5.25-inch disks were also in use. However, not all floppies were created equal.

5.25-inch Disk – The Big Black Disk we originally had: (Top Left in Picture)

-Single Density disks: 360 kilobytes (KB) of data

-Double Density disks : 720KB.

3.5-inch: Smaller, more solid disk (Bottom Left in Picture)

-Single Density disks: 720 kilobytes (KB) of data

-Double Density disks : 1.44 megabytes (MB)

The Ingenious Hack

So, what was this ingenious hack? It was as simple as using a drill to create an extra hole in the floppy disk’s casing. One of the most appealing aspects of this hack was the potential for cost savings. Official Double Density disks could be quite expensive, but with the drill hack you could save some cash.

Do you remember doing this?

Got any hacks for us to talk about? 🙂

Subscription Models – A Bane on the IT Industry

In recent years, the software industry has undergone a seismic shift, with subscription models becoming the dominant method of software distribution. While proponents argue that these models offer flexibility and convenience, I firmly believe that they are a bane on the IT industry. Subscription models do not save users money in the long run, rely on people’s forgetfulness to extract payment, and are inherently dishonest.

Advocates of subscription-based software often tout the apparent cost savings as a key selling point. They argue that by paying a smaller monthly or annual fee, users can access the latest updates and features without the hefty upfront cost of purchasing software outright. However, this is a deceptive argument. Over time, the cumulative cost of a subscription can far surpass the one-time purchase price of software. It’s a cunning trick, where the software companies ensure a steady stream of income while the customer continually pays, often without realizing the true cost.

Once you subscribe to a service, it’s easy to set up automatic billing and forget about it. This hands-off approach may seem convenient, but it encourages a disconnect between the user and their spending habits. Users might find themselves paying for software they rarely use, or even forgot they had subscribed to in the first place. This convenient forgetfulness becomes a profit centre for software companies, as they continue to collect payments without delivering value.

Moreover, the subscription model fosters a sense of dishonesty in the software industry. Companies often use tactics such as automatic renewals, hidden fees, and complex terms and conditions to trap users into ongoing payments. It’s disheartening to see the industry resort to such tactics to secure profits. Instead of competing on the quality of their software, companies engage in a race to the bottom, prioritizing short-term gains over long-term customer trust.

But it’s not just customers who suffer from subscription models; the IT industry as a whole is adversely affected. Smaller businesses and start-ups, in particular, find themselves struggling to keep up with the ever-increasing software subscription costs. This hampers innovation and economic growth, as valuable resources are redirected towards software expenses rather than investment in new technologies and talent.

Indeed, as a seasoned player in the IT industry, BOSS IT has encountered numerous clients who have fallen victim to the subscription model trap, only realizing the drain on their bank accounts when it’s too late. However, we also acknowledge that subscription models can have their place if managed properly. It’s crucial to strike a balance and recognize that, just like managed services, they can be a way for companies to profit from the forgetfulness or ignorance of their users.

Managed services, when executed transparently and ethically, can be a valuable asset for businesses. They offer proactive maintenance, regular updates, and a support structure that can be a lifesaver for organizations with limited IT resources. However, when mismanaged or used as an excuse for lackluster customer support, managed services can indeed exploit the ignorance of clients, leading to a feeling of dependency that keeps businesses locked into costly agreements.

Similarly, subscription models can be a win-win scenario when software companies genuinely focus on delivering continuous value to their customers. Regular updates, improved features, and reliable customer support can justify the ongoing costs. However, when companies prioritize profit over customer satisfaction, they rely on users’ forgetfulness to keep the revenue stream flowing.

The responsibility falls on both sides of the equation. Users must stay vigilant, regularly reviewing their subscriptions, and taking control of their financial commitments. Companies, on the other hand, should embrace transparency, ethical business practices, and strive to provide tangible value for the fees they charge.

At BOSS IT, we firmly believe in responsible and ethical business practices. We advocate for subscription models and managed services that are clear, beneficial, and flexible to meet the evolving needs of clients. Our goal is to empower users with knowledge and understanding, helping them make informed decisions about their IT investments.

Boss IT Solutions – Fixing a Ricoh That Spawns HTML Pages

Meet Boss IT Solutions, your go-to experts for unravelling tech mysteries, including fixing a Ricoh printer spawning HTML pages. We’re here to tackle the evolving challenges of the IT landscape with precision and expertise.

Unraveling the Mysteries of Black Hole Firewalls

Black holes have always captured our imagination. These cosmic giants, formed from the remnants of massive stars, are known for their intense gravitational pull, which even light cannot escape. We revisit an old theory – the black hole firewall.

Black holes form when massive stars burn out their nuclear fuel and collapse under the relentless force of gravity. They create a region in space known as the event horizon, which is a one-way boundary where anything can enter, but nothing can escape. This concept is grounded in Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity.

The Information Paradox

The event horizon, however, poses a problem known as the “information paradox.” According to quantum mechanics, information cannot be lost, yet objects entering a black hole seem to vanish without a trace.

Enter the Firewall Hypothesis

Physicist Joseph Polchinski proposed a solution in 2012: the black hole firewall. According to this idea, at the event horizon, a searing wall of high-energy particles and radiation exists, akin to a blazing firewall. It would obliterate any information trying to cross the event horizon, reconciling quantum mechanics with general relativity.

Closing Thoughts

While the concept of black hole firewalls is still largely theoretical today, it’s exciting to imagine the potential they may hold for humanity’s future exploration and understanding of the cosmos. As science continues to push boundaries and gather new knowledge, we remain open to the ever-expanding mysteries of the universe.

(Our understanding of the universe is based on established models, but scientific knowledge remains open to evolution with new data, provided it remains untainted. So, we assure you open-mindedness, whether the Earth is flat, a globe, or even a banana).

Did Y2K Push the World Toward Windows?

As we revisit the Y2K bug scare, we find it was more than just a millennium panic. It played a significant role in the rise of Windows operating systems.

The Y2K bug, or Millennium Bug, was an alleged computer glitch caused by date programming in older systems. It raised concerns that computers would misinterpret the year when transitioning from December 31, 1999, to January 1, 2000, potentially leading to chaos.

Governments and organizations globally invested billions to supposedly fix and update computer code, ensuring systems could handle the new millennium. These preparations included software fixes and contingency planning.

As midnight struck on January 1, 2000, the anticipated disasters did not occur. However, the legacy of Y2K persisted in unexpected ways.

One outcome of Y2K preparations was the widespread adoption of Windows operating systems. How Convenient. At this time, I was punching away in Visual C# on my Windows 98 Packard Bell, I knew something wasn’t quite right. In my opinion, the Y2K scare accelerated the global shift toward Windows.

In the end, there were very few problems. For instance, a nuclear energy facility in Ishikawa, Japan, had some of its radiation equipment fail, but backup facilities ensured there was no threat to the public.
While Y2K didn’t lead to global disasters, it did prompt significant technology upgrades.

Windows emerged as a dominant player, thanks in part to its advantages during this transitional period.

Have you personally experienced or heard of any interesting stories related to Y2K. Share your anecdotes or insights in the comments below!